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How Much an Effective In-House Content Marketing Team Will Cost

By Taylor Oster

HowMuchAnEffectiveInHouseContentMarketingTeamWillCost.jpgAt Influence & Co., we talk to business and marketing leaders all the time about what it takes to do content marketing successfully, and a frequent concern we hear sounds a bit like this:

Yes, my business needs content marketing, but I dont know whether its something I should build internally or outsource.

And that concern is valid. Plenty of pros and cons come into play when you decide whether to outsource content marketing, hire internally, or practice some combination of the two.

Let’s say you’ve weighed those pros and cons and decided that you’d like to explore building your own in-house team to do content marketing. Who do you need to hire? What technology do you need to invest in? Lets break down some essential costs to help clarify how much money it takes to set up your content program for success.

The Essential Team Members of Your Content Marketing Team

Content marketing isn’t a one-woman show. It takes several different skill sets to ensure a content program drives results. Depending on the goals of your content marketing strategy, your expert team might include people with specialties in SEO, web development, conversion rate optimization, public relations, and inside sales, as well as resources like content management platforms, marketing automation systems, and more.

Below is a list of the core members of a content marketing team, the types of software this team would find valuable, and the average cost for each team member and item:

As skilled and experienced as each of these key players may be, they can’t do everything themselves. Your content marketing team members need the right tools and resources to help them maximize their time and energy — and your investment.

  • Project Management Software: prices range from free to $100 per month

With so many team members working on projects together, keeping everyone on the same page is especially critical. Thankfully, there are plenty of tools out there to help you monitor project progress, collaborate on content, streamline your communication, track analytics, and even manage your editorial calendar.

The entire team at Influence & Co. uses our custom content marketing software, ICo Core, for all of these functions and more. Other solutions include Trello, CoSchedule, Basecamp, and Brightpod.

  • Marketing Automation Software: estimated cost between $200 and $12,000 per month, depending on the plan and number of contacts in your system

The Influence & Co. marketing team uses HubSpot to manage our marketing automation. This powerhouse system allows us to track our website analytics, maintain our company blog, and automate content distribution via email and social media, as well as easily capture and deliver leads to our sales team and track them from their first interaction with our team all the way to a signed contract.

This tool is essential for increasing our team’s productivity and tracking the ROI of our efforts. While we love working with HubSpot, it isn’t the only solution out there; other marketing automation systems include Pardot, Marketo, and Eloqua.

  • Customer Relationship Management Software: base prices range from $50 to $400 per month

Having a process in place that allows you to deliver leads generated through your content efforts to your sales team is critical. Some marketing automation systems such as HubSpot have this feature built in, but you might find that more robust CRM systems like Salesforce, Infusionsoft, or Hatchbuck work better for your goals and needs.

  • Content Amplification: estimated cost between $50 and $100 per article published

Getting the content marketing results youre looking for is pretty difficult without a network of engaged followers and brand advocates to distribute your content to. Building that network takes time and a lot of trust, but you can accelerate your efforts by investing in paid content amplification.

In fact, according to research from Contently CEO Shane Snow:

If we said it cost $1 to acquire a social follower, it would take almost six years for organic Facebook clicks to pay off the cost of acquiring your followers versus just buying the clicks through paid updates.

With all the time, effort, and money you’ve already put into creating a piece of content, what’s an extra $100 to make sure it gets in front of the right members of your target audience? Letting it sit on your blog forever without pushing it in front of the right audiences won’t do you any good.

Through a combination of organic distribution on social media and highly targeted paid distribution on the organic efforts already working, you can broadcast your content to your audience — and build and nurture your network along the way.

  • Search Analytics: estimated cost between $80 and $600 per month

To see long-term content marketing ROI, your content must be optimized for search. Tools like Searchmetrics, Moz, and Ahrefs can help you track your current keyword rankings, understand your competitors content, and optimize your own site for search.

For your business to see content marketing success, you’ll need to invest in each of these key team members and the tools they need to do their jobs well. And while the actual cost of each item might vary depending on your location, industry, goals, and needs, you still have to ask yourself whether your company has the financial resources to build this in-house team. If not, it just might make more sense to partner with an outsourced team of experts able to help you hit the ground running and drive real results for your company.

Learn more about building your own in-house content team below:

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Posted on February 7, 2017

About Taylor Oster

I'm creatively passionate about making every day the greatest day of my life. I'm a lover of trying new things, telling stories, and, of course, singing along to my favorite song, "Call Me Maybe."

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